Building the Connection to Leslie Barns (Updated December 8, 2014)

Progress continues, albeit slowly, on the Leslie Street connection. Much of the utility work is now completed, and a finished road, including streetcar track, is starting to appear in some blocks.

December 8, 2014

September 24, 2014

As segments of the utility work below Leslie Street are completed, the project has reached the stage where track, or at least foundations for track, are starting to appear south of Queen Street. The photos below were taken on September 21.

June 22, 2014

Streetcar service has resumed on Queen between Broadview and Coxwell with the completion of the intersection at Leslie. This will continue until Monday, June 30 when reconstruction of the intersection at Broadview will require that streetcars divert via Gerrard for about three weeks.

June 17, 2014

The last of the concrete work on the new tracks was being poured when I visited the site this morning. However, curb lanes at the intersection remain an excavation waiting to be restored.

Current TTC plans are for transit service, both bus and streetcar, to resume using Queen Street between Broadview and Coxwell on Sunday, June 22 so that full, normal service will be in place for Pride Week.

The Queen car will return to a diversion via Gerrard (between Coxwell and Parliament) on Monday, June 30 when reconstruction of the intersection at Broadview begins. Based on the time required at Victoria Street earlier this year, that should be roughly a three week project.

Queen and Kingston Road shuttle buses will divert around the Broadview project via Carlaw, Dundas and River Streets.

Work on track south from Queen to the Leslie Barns at Commissioners Street will occur later in 2014 after utility work is completed.

June 10, 2014

When I last visited the site, I thought “there won’t be any track here for a few days, I will come back next week”. On occasion, the TTC can move astoundingly swiftly as the photos below from Harold McMann show. What was a big empty excavation on June 5 became, by June 9, a fully assembled junction.

June 5, 2014

Utility work to replace nearly century-old infrastructure beneath Queen & Leslie is now complete, and construction of the new intersection can begin.

An update [pdf, 4mb] from the Community Office shows some of the recent work and details the staging of what is to come for the balance of 2014. Information is included about the Queen/Broadview reconstruction planned for late June through July.

Information about Leslie Barns in general can be found at the TTC’s Leslie Barns project page.

73 thoughts on “Building the Connection to Leslie Barns (Updated December 8, 2014)

  1. It’s a shame that with all of these streetcar projects under construction, increasing public support for new streetcar lines, or new routes along existing tracks, is not even on the radar.

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  2. I forget, how much extra did this boondoggle cost us?

    Steve: I am not sure which part of the project you refer to as a boondoggle. The total budget for the new car barns, connection track, utility upgrades and street reconstruction is just under $500m. Toronto Water is carrying part of the cost related to replacement of their antique infrastructure.

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  3. I must congratulate the TTC on the public explanation of what they are doing – I have never seen such a detailed public plan before.

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  4. Again someone keeps calling needed watermain work, sewer construction, electrical work, and non-TTC work in general a boondoggle. Why must the TTC keep getting blamed for that, when those people are just looking for more excuses to dump on the TTC?

    Steve: It reminds me of St. Clair and the problems it had, but this time, the work has been much better co-ordinated. Three weeks for the utilities and three weeks for the track is not a bad construction speed at all.

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  5. (Sigh) WHY WHY WHY is it so hard to even think of, say, extending track on Coxwell to the subway, and even utilizing the current station loop? What makes it harder to lay streetcar track today compared to 100 years’ ago, underground infrastructure notwithstanding? Rant from a streetcar need over …

    Steve: The track north of Gerrard was abandoned when the Danforth subway opened because, in those days, we were gradually paring back the streetcar network. The biggest problem with your scheme (leaving aside any question of whether there is enough demand to warrant this) is that Coxwell Station Loop is too small for a proper streetcar loop, especially with 30m cars about to enter service. It was built for what were then two rather sleepy bus routes.

    Compare the enormous Bathurst built to serve demand to events at the CNE which long ago evaporated, or Dufferin where the surface route was thought to be so inconsequential it didn’t even warrant a loop and a closed transfer to the subway.

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  6. From what I read the initial budget for the Leslie Barnes was $348m in 2010.

    That jumped to $497 at tender or through scope changes or contract addendums.

    Then there was the water main issue. The City of TO claimed they informed TTC what was under the road but maybe??

    The watermain issue required a big time sheet piling construction sequence.

    In the end it does not matter that Toronto Water (Public Works) is carrying the extra cost.

    The streetcar upgrade is over $2 billion.

    Steve: If there is a culprit here, it has to be the TTC, although I have long suspected that there was some private deal that allowed an otherwise worthless piece of land to be offloaded at a considerable agency-to-agency cost to the TTC. During the site selection, any discussion of sites other than Leslie/Commissioners was systematically shut down. As for the water main, it would have to be replaced within a decade or so anyhow, but there is some debate about just how much the TTC knew before they started down that path. They were quite adamant about using Leslie as the carhouse access route. Another thing they didn’t pick up was the Hydro One high voltage cable running along the north edge of the site. That cost about $9m to relocate.

    There is a much deeper, fundamental problem at work here. The process for evaluating various options, the Environmental Assessment, or even the short version, the Transit Project Assessment, actually takes place before detailed site condition investigations. An approved EA/TPA for a site and implementation then has its own momentum regardless of problems encountered along the way when it is too late to turn back.

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  7. David Cavlovic said:

    What makes it harder to lay streetcar track today compared to 100 years’ ago, underground infrastructure notwithstanding?

    Lawyers.

    Steve: Although we might be tempted to take Shakespeare’s advice from Henry VI, Part 2, there is actually more to it than legal entanglements and utilities. Of course there are far more utilities under streets today than there were a century ago, and the old ones are often not where they are shown on maps (“as built” drawings didn’t mean as much when so few agencies used the space). The biggest change is that the roads are now built to carry heavy trucks, and the streetcar infrastructure is built to last a very long time.

    The trucks triggered the shift to concrete slab construction decades ago, but the important change more recently is the three-slab constuction we see today. The bottom slab is the foundation and it should be there for close to a century. Next up is the layer holding the ties which, for tangent track (and parts of intersections), are steel with mounts for Pandrol clips. The top layer holds the rail.

    In several locations, we have already seen how reconstruction is handled (look at any of the stop rail replacements on Queen East) with only the top layer of concrete plus the old rails coming up, but the two bottom layers staying in place. It has taken over two decades to rebuild the system to this standard, and the intersections, which started later, are not quite half done to new standards.

    The days of seeing track construction like that on Queens Quay are nearly over because the expensive, top to bottom rebuilds will be out of the way. Speaking of “bottom”, if you saw the track that was taken out of Roncesvalles a few years ago, there was far less concrete in the road (barely a few inches in places) and the ground under the tracks was sand.

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  8. Steve said:

    Speaking of “bottom”, if you saw the track that was taken out of Roncesvalles a few years ago, there was far less concrete in the road (barely a few inches in places) and the ground under the tracks was sand.

    What I found interesting with the rebuilding of the tracks along Upper Gerrard was the number of wooden ties they were ripping out of the ground before they poured the support slab. I’m still kicking myself that I didn’t try to see if any of them had a datenail.

    On the subject of streetcar tracks of the past, keep an eye on the repaving work along Danforth this summer. The old streetcar tracks had begun to resurface in places and they might finally remove them.

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  9. Re: old streetcar tracks. Church Street still has some rails in it. One recently surfaced on the southeast corner at Wellesley. There’s another one on the southeast side of Front and Sherbourne.

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  10. J McMillan said:

    “There’s another one [streetcar rail] on the southeast side of Front and Sherbourne.”

    This will go when Lower Sherbourne is rebuilt starting late summer. At the same time the last remaining metal TTC poles (for streetcar overhead going to the former TTC streetcar barns at Front/Frederick where the Young Peoples’ Theatre now is) will be removed from the west side of Lower Sherbourne between Front and The Esplanade. These, some of which currently have streetlights, have, I think been unused by the TTC for over 50 years!

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  11. How many incidents will it take before the ttc realizes they may need an alternate route to The Barns?

    All it’s going to take is a blockage of the connection track first thing in the morning for service to collapse….

    What are the chances in the near future we end up seeing a set of tracks on eastern to Connaught or Russel, or Lakeshore to Coxwell?

    Steve: There was a lot of discussion of this during the site selection process. Basically any of the potential sites only had one access route, at least initially. Long term plans have track going west via Commissioners to connect into the Port Lands network, but don’t hold your breath waiting for it.

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  12. I still think there are some old rails on St. Clair just west of Mt. Pleasant. Not sure though.

    As for routes to Leslie Barns (she was a stripper at Jilly’s), there’s only one route to the Russell Yard as well. Until the Port Lands are developed, I wouldn’t bet on anything going in down there. Unwin Ave is the best bet, but I could see both avenues servicing the boatload of people destined to be down there.

    Steve: Actually Russell can be accessed from the west (currently closed due to work at Leslie) and from the east.

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  13. Might not be the correct thread Steve, but since you were talking about modern streetcar construction technique, I though I could pose a question for you. I have written a letter to the TTC, but have yet to receive a response.

    Its regarding some of the track condition I have observed with the “new standard”, particularly along Coxwell, between upper and lower Gerrard. It is new construction, but going downhill fast – really fast. The primary culprit is the top layer of concrete on the outside of the tracks that abuts the asphalt, it is “tipping or dipping” in locations and has pulled the insulating rubber sleeve away from the rail and all manner of debris, and salt has infiltrated the space.

    The city, not the TTC, has been filling this as though it were potholes with asphalt. I’ve worked as a construction manager, although I do Environmental not Civil, but it seems a couple of things were at work. I think the top layer wasn’t allowed to cure long enough, and the cuts on the outer sides of the rails were made too deep. Essentially the outer concrete slab is behaving like they were pavers, breaking and moving.

    I have observed this in a few other places, and I have tried to raise the matter with the TTC to no avail. The problem is this is like a leak in your roof – if you don’t fix it promptly, you replace the whole roof. The city’s brainless fix is making the situation worse . The centre of the slab is now going, likely because of the vibratory effect as the insulating sleeve is destroyed/filled with debris.

    This is infuriating as a simple concrete crew, could have quickly broken out and repaired the outer ends of the top slab very effectively during slow periods. The cost would have been minimal. As it stands now, at least on Coxwell, I think the entire top layer needs to go. I believe it is only 10 years correct?

    It is heartbreaking because the TTC’s new standard is really good, and it should preclude people attacking streetcar infrastructure and “never ending” reconstruction/disruption. But the TTC does not seem to understand what “State of Good Repair” means in this case. Although, as you have noted, this has become an all encompassing term, for anything that suits them at the time.

    Would like to know your thoughts, or if you could raise this with your contacts at the TTC. Have you observed this effect elsewhere on the system?

    Steve: Yes, I have seen this problem elsewhere. It seems to be a basic flaw in the roadway design because those sections between the rail and the curb lane (which is either not rebuilt as part of the same job, or is built separately) are small enough to acquire a life of their own.

    I will see if I can find out anything on this.

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  14. J McMillan said:

    “There’s another one [streetcar rail] on the southeast side of Front and Sherbourne.”

    On Tuesday morning city crews were cutting into Sherbourne, the tracks, albeit rusty, were fully visible through the cut.

    Cobblestone taken away, but still, nice to see a piece of history before it’s pulled up.

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  15. It is interesting to see the changes that have been captured by Google street view now that enough time has elapsed, and enough images taken to record the evolution of the network:

    Removal of track at Townsley loop
    Removal of specialwork and curves to Wychwood Barns
    Surfacing of previously paved-over streetcar track

    And with the next drive by:

    Removal of one way track and associated specialwork on York
    New connecting tracks to Cherry and Leslie
    Removal of one way track on Wellington and Richmond?

    Steve: Both Richmond and Wellington will lose their wrong-way track in time. Work on Richmond was delayed because Toronto Water needs to finish first, and on Wellington because Front Street is also closed for work at Union Station.

    I wonder what will be next… Regardless, 30 years from now, a scroll through street view for any transit enthusiast will be fascinating.

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  16. That’s nice, the tracks are in. I visited the site on afternoon of June 6 and they had the entire concrete base poured in. The were using water hoses and a sprinkler to water the concrete while it was curing on a hot sunny day. The site was quite different compared to the photos from the 5th.

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  17. Jamie said:

    “The primary culprit is the top layer of concrete on the outside of the tracks that abuts the asphalt, it is “tipping or dipping” in locations and has pulled the insulating rubber sleeve away from the rail and all manner of debris, and salt has infiltrated the space.”

    As Steve notes, this is a common problem and can be seen on King east of George (where track was replaced in about 2002), on Parliament at Adelaide and on Church at Lombard where track was replaced more recently. I am not an engineer but suspect the concrete was not given enough time to cure properly.

    With the TTC’s new way of laying track it ought to be fairly easy to remove the deteriorated concrete on the outside of the tracks and pour a fresh layer but, of course, the City usually just fills in any cracks with asphalt. As the concrete is loose and not removed this has a predictably short life!

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  18. This is coming to the Planning & Growth Management meeting next week. Will it apply to track like Adelaide and the wrong-way tracks on Wellington & Richmond?

    The Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) has approximately 300 km of active streetcar tracks and 3.2 km of unused (or “decommissioned”) streetcar tracks in the city. These streetcar tracks, whether active or inactive, present a challenge and hazard to cyclists particularly when riding parallel to these tracks or crossing these tracks at an angle, and especially during wet weather conditions.

    Although the complete removal of inactive streetcar tracks is the most effective way of addressing the hazard created by these tracks to cyclists, it is very costly. Transportation Services examined alternative ways to address the hazards associated with these decommissioned tracks as an interim measure. A pilot project was undertaken that involved the use of various materials to fill the streetcar track flanges (i.e. grooves) of those decommissioned tracks that are not planned for removal by the TTC in the near future as part of their capital works program or in conjunction with a road rehabilitation.

    This report provides the findings of the pilot project, which was carried out on the inactive tracks on Wychwood Avenue just south of St Clair Avenue West. The test results indicate that of the alternate materials used to fill the grooves (concrete, asphalt, thermoplastic paint and epoxy resin) the asphalt and the thermoplastic paint were the most durable, bonded well to the track grooves and provided good traction for cyclists.

    On the basis of this pilot study, Transportation Services will proceed with the filling of the decommissioned streetcar track flanges in 2014 in order to improve the safety of cyclists on these roads as soon as possible.”

    The track on Victoria and Wellington – which is NOT decommissioned – is also very dangerous for cyclists as it is in extremely poor condition and there are huge gaps beside the rails in many locations.

    Steve: The report you cite is not yet online. Without seeing it, I have no idea of the City’s intentions. As you know both Richmond and Wellington have been slated for reconstruction, and so whatever is done there does not have to be a long-lived solution.

    More to the point in all of this is that there is only a small amount of decommissioned track, and the more general issue of cyclists and streetcar track does not go away.

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  19. Just curious, on simple curves like these, does the TTC use spirals or constant radius?

    Steve: I suspect it is constant radius, but leave myself open to correction if someone knows differently.

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  20. Sorry! It’s a Public Works Report.

    It only seems to be track on Wychwood Avenue, Strathmore Boulevard and Kipling Avenue so ignores the equally dangerous wrong-way track and is of even less use than I thought at first!

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  21. The Queen & Leslie work is slightly delayed because of Toronto Water and the work they did in the intersection, and that’s why the tracwork started a bit later than planned, but they should be able to hit the June 21 completion target. From a service perspective, it doesn’t really make a difference, since the track will be shut down anyway until July 20 at the earliest.

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  22. Steve said:

    More to the point in all of this is that there is only a small amount of decommissioned track, and the more general issue of cyclists and streetcar track does not go away.

    More annoying than old track for bikers is crumbling or bulging cement->pavement joints on in-use track as this is often closer to the edge of the middle lane – and with parked cars etc. it is more likely that you will be riding parallel to it and get your tire stuck…and the holes are often bigger than the track itself (and more irregular) … I’ve noticed this in a few places around town …

    I wonder what the best way to resolve this is, filling with asphalt is obviously faster, but filling with concrete and reshaping it might be better … maybe it takes more time though …

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  23. George Bell said:

    I wonder what the best way to resolve this is, filling with asphalt is obviously faster, but filling with concrete and reshaping it might be better … maybe it takes more time though …

    What might be the best way is to go with prefabricated concrete segments. That way, when they fail, they can be dug up and a replacement dropped in in a time span comparable to putting in an asphalt patch.

    Steve: Not quite as simple as it sounds. The problem is not with the concrete itself, at least initially, but with the space around it that fills with water that freezes and cracks the concrete.

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  24. Fibre reinforced concrete (either metallic or synthetic) increases the ductility of the hardened concrete, and limits crack width and spacing. While nothing is forever, the use of fibre reinforced concrete for these outer sections might extend the lifespan by enough to reach the next rail replacement cycle, without requiring substantial changes to the current methodology of track installation/concrete pour sequencing.

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  25. Jamie said:

    The primary culprit is the top layer of concrete on the outside of the tracks that abuts the asphalt, it is “tipping or dipping” in locations and has pulled the insulating rubber sleeve away from the rail and all manner of debris, and salt has infiltrated the space.

    For what it’s worth, it appears that the track construction on Queens Quay is pouring the outer edge strip of the tracks monolithically with the layer that contains the ties. Only the spaces between the rails (in each direction, and between the 2 tracks) are poured as a 3rd layer of concrete.

    How this will affect the TTC’s ability to remove and replace the rails without breaking up the underlying layers is a question for the future, I guess.

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  26. Steve, I saw a weird old guy photographing at the construction site, was that you?

    Steve: I have not been photographing there for over a week. I am only moderately old, and not very weird. See photo here.

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  27. Steve wrote:

    “…the more general issue of cyclists and streetcar track does not go away.”

    Kevin’s comment:

    Central Amsterdam has a 70% cycle mode share with much of the remaining 30% carried on the streetcar tracks that cover the city. Yet somehow they avoid mass death.

    I don’t know the technical means used to adapt the tracks to make them non-dangerous to cyclists. Perhaps some other reader could chime in.

    Steve: An important distinction is whether the track is in its own lanes or if cyclists share the lanes with transit vehicles as in Toronto. It does not take much effort to browse Google Street View and find many examples of streets with segregated lanes and cycling/tram, crossings. Amsterdam appears to use girder rail (with a flangeway) moreso than Toronto where “T” rail is common for straight sections and for the outer rail on curves. This affects the depth of the flangeway beside the rails, but does not eliminate it. I suspect that a major difference lies in street designs that minimize situations where motorists force cyclists across the tracks unexpectedly or in ways that they are unprepared for. This is a lot easier to do when the streetcars are in their own lanes.

    I came upon an intersection that is 7/8 of a grand union. Note the segregation of usage and the presence of girder rail throughout.

    It would be interesting to hear from readers who have actually cycled in Amsterdam for first-hand experience.

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  28. “Would like to know your thoughts, or if you could raise this with your contacts at the TTC. Have you observed this effect elsewhere on the system?”

    There’s a similar section of degraded concrete surrounding the rails on Carlton St at Church St. Starting 20m east of Church and proceeding through the intersection, concrete has crumbled creating a dangerous situation for pedestrians and cyclists, especially around the E/S and N/W curves. The concrete between the rails recently lifted between the tangent rails east of Church. The city patches the area with asphalt monthly.

    Its clearly a bad concrete segment as the rest of the Carlton track is in very good shape. Yet instead of repairing this segment the TTC ignores the problem which continues to deteriorate. A small repair will soon become an expensive fix.

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  29. I didn’t cycle in Amsterdam or Europe last fall but I did walk in it and a lot of cities with trams and bicycles. Where there is trackage in the street the most noticeable thing is that it is almost always girder rail and that the girder is narrower than what was used in North America. You can see the dimensions and profiles of different European and North American street car girder rail here.

    The Europeans also use a narrower wheel profiles.

    The site explains what should be done in track design and uses very modern and very very old examples. It is a very good read.

    Steve: It is amazing how much hard-earned knowledge the “professional railfans” have.

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  30. I’ve biked there. The girder rail helps but I think a bigger difference is fatter bicycle tires. Everyone there uses sensible city bikes, not something with skinny tires that are only needed if you happen to enter a time-trial mid commute.

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  31. Joe says:

    “Steve, I saw a weird old guy photographing at the construction site, was that you?

    Steve: I have not been photographing there for over a week. I am only moderately old, and not very weird.”

    Perhaps you saw Mr. Harold McMann, retired Overhead expert. He’s a bit older than Steve, and he’s not weird at all either. He carries a camera and a smile.

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  32. Steve wrote:

    “I came upon an intersection that is 7/8 of a grand union.”

    Kevin’s comment:

    Wow! That looks a lot like many Toronto neighbourhoods. Except it has the streetcar in its own ROW, protected cycle lanes… sigh.

    Some day that will look like an “after” photo. Right now we’ve got the “before.”

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  33. Is there any sign of the overhead going in for the intersection, or will this remain with tangent overhead until the remainder of the connecting track is built?

    Steve: Only tangent wire is required to restore service and this can be quickly installed once overhead trucks have access to the intersection. The new support poles to hold up more complex overhead for the intersection won’t be installed until July.

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  34. Can this intersection be built with pan-only overhead seeing as how the CLRV’s and ALRV’s will never need to turn off Queen?

    I too have noticed spots in rebuilt sections that thump due to degradation of the trackbed. There are a couple of spots on Queen between the Don and Broadview which they will hopefully repair concurrently with the intersection shutdown in July.

    Steve: The intersection must still allow trolley-pole equipped CLRV/ALRVs to run along Queen Street. It will be interesting to see if the yard at Leslie Barns is strung without frogs in a pan-only configuration. Trolley pole cars could get there, but would need assistance to move around the yard.

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  35. Just curious, are the LRT track/ girder rails and wheel flange profile going to be same as the TTC street cars? If not, do you know what the TTC decided on? I do realize that there is going to be difference TTC (streetcar) and standard gauge (LRT).

    The next question, is the LRT design for Ottawa and Waterloo, potentially for Mississauga and Hamilton going to match with Toronto’s LRT. Are they planning on using different girder rails and wheel flange profiles?

    Cheers
    Malcolm

    Steve: The design of the Metrolinx lines is up to them, not to the TTC. Anyone who knows the technical details for Ottawa and Waterloo is welcome to chime in here, preferably with links to specs.

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  36. Why doesn’t the Bathurst streetcar go to St Clair West station?

    Steve: Because the demand pattern on Bathurst Street does not support such an operation. People on the Bathurst bus are primarily headed to the subway, not further south on Bathurst, but even for those who are, a transfer would be required somewhere enroute. The old (pre 1966) pattern of transfers off of the St. Clair car to the Bathurst (and Fort) streetcar services long predate the opening of the Spadina subway, and also reflected the fact that the Bathurst car went to Church Street via Adelaide, not to the CNE, at that time.

    Also Bathurst Station Loop is not set up for mixed northbound and southbound service from the streetcar platform, and this would be quite difficult with the new, longer streetcars if they attempted to turn in off of Bathurst southbound.

    While you’re here, you might want to pick up a new handle as that “unelected Premier” just got a majority government.

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  37. David Weil’s observation (June 16, 2014) regarding the concrete (Devil Strip?) outside the outer track in Toronto is interesting. I have long thought that this arrangement is fundamentally flawed since there is no structural continuity with the “tie layer” of concrete below, and that portion of the track/paving assembly is further compromised by the frequent bituminous fibre-board control joints and I think in some locations, a sprayed bond breaker. I noticed in a recent photo of a Melbourne street that the asphalt traffic surface is brought right up to the outside of the outer rail and wonder if that approach might have some application here, since there could be a homogeneous, relatively plastic and water resistant road surface (asphalt) extending to the resilient sleeve surrounding the rail, and with the advantage of continuity of this section with the adjacent pavement and its surface layer.

    Steve: The “Devil Strip” is the space in the middle of the road between the inner rails. The name comes from systems on which this is quite narrow and only “the devil” would be thin enough to stand there while two streetcars passed.

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  38. malcolmm says:
    June 18, 2014 at 2:30 pm

    “Just curious, are the LRT track/ girder rails and wheel flange profile going to be same as the TTC street cars? If not, do you know what the TTC decided on? I do realize that there is going to be difference TTC (streetcar) and standard gauge (LRT).

    “The next question, is the LRT design for Ottawa and Waterloo, potentially for Mississauga and Hamilton going to match with Toronto’s LRT. Are they planning on using different girder rails and wheel flange profiles?”

    I believe KW tacked their LRT order onto the back of the Metrolinx order so the vehicles are the same. Since Metrolinx keeps talking about Hurontario-Main and since they have ordered a lot of cars that they won’t need in Toronto I would bet that they will use the same vehicles. I believe that Ottawa has ordered their cars from a different supplier but it would be an awfully long run to the GTHA anyway.

    Since most of the route for KW and Hurontario-Main will be on Private Right of Way, except for the last km or 2 in Brampton there is not much need for girder rail. What is in mixed traffic will probably be 115 lb/yd AAR rail like is used in Toronto streetcars and subway, on the lines that GO runs and just about every other transit and commuter only line in North America. There might be girder rail at curves that are laid in streets. All switches will probably be double blade and railway style unless they are in the road allowance.

    The 115 lb/yd AAR rail has a different contour than European rail, especially the girder rail, so the wheel profile will be one that matches that rail. There are different wheel profiles for different types of track and for different types of usage. The odds are that the KW, Hurontario-Main, Ottawa and Metrolinx cars will use the same wheel profile as the other LRT lines in North America. If it ain’t broke don’t fix it.

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  39. Will the TTC still have the new streetcars delivered via truck to Hillcrest, or, with the rail spur serving the Ashbridges Bay treatment plant immediately south of the Leslie Barns, will the TTC have the vehicles shipped directly to the new yard? It will be interesting to see what happens to Hillcrest with respect to preservation of its streetcar track connection (and future vehicle deliveries) once all major maintenance has shifted to Leslie. Is the transfer table long enough to accommodate one of the new streetcars? Would the TTC still elect to perform minor maintenance at Hillcrest, or is Leslie being set up to take over everything?

    Steve: Deliveries will continue to be at Hillcrest where a special siding was constructed for this purpose. A new car will not fit on the transfer table, but the table is used as a bridge to get to a set of tracks at the northeast corner of Harvey Shops.

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